Wang Shu’s Xiangshan School Campus Brings Chinese Architecture Back To Its Roots
The design for this campus is considered as a start of a reform. The choice of themes is directed by traditional construction culture and its continuation: Garden making, construction, differentiation, material recycling and reuse. The Chinese character of “ ªÿ” [enclose] is the theme of the series, which forms the layout of “ ”™“ [create, compose, shape, form, construct]. In fact, the simple “court” of traditional China can be made to accommodate nearly all functions. What is attempted here is a “court”-based free typology, related to both, the tradition and more importantly, the gigantic space and functional requirement of this building. In the character of “ ªÿ” building and nature occupy half of the space. As the sloping, twisting, and turning occurs on the site, the building twists and transforms accordingly, thus addresses uniformity and variation at the same time. The inevitable bulk of the buildings are purposefully lowered, horizontal sunscreen slope emphasizes the horizontal extension of the corresponding mountain range. The base of the handicraft-school is made with stone by a local method, traditionally used in the local tea field construction. This is a symbolic gesture representing the rooting of the school in the surrounding. An important aspect of the design is the “free” concept. This “free” concept is not just about its architectural forms, but its sensitive response to the nature. The structures are usually similar or identical to each other, but its variations are created by the relationship with the site. The basic architectural types are sensible to fast and large scale constructions. At the same time, changes in design are frequent and spontaneous during construction process. This provides a platform from where architects and artists will participate in the process to “build”. A large collection of over two millions pieces of tiles of different ages and sizes, salvaged from the traditional houses demolished all over the province of Zhejiang, will cover the roofs of the campus architecture. In sharp contrast to the fast and mass construction concept of today, the concept seeks to embody another philosophy.Project location: Zhuantang Town, Hangzhou City, ChinaSite Area: 200 mu [one mu = 666,66 sqm]Project size: 67.000 sqmcomposed of ten buildings, including a library, a gallery, a small stadium, a workshop tower, six academic and workshop buildings, two traditional style bridges cross the river, two hillside art studio.Architect: WANG Shu, LU WenyuFirm: Ye-Yu Architectural Design Studio/CAAFirm in Cooperation: CCA/Landscape Design CompanyDesign Period: 3/2002 – 3/2003Construction Period: 5/2003 – 12/2004Structure type: Reinforced concrete frame + steel frame 
Via:http://www.chinese-architects.com/en/amateur/projects_en.html

Wang Shu’s Xiangshan School Campus Brings Chinese Architecture Back To Its Roots

The design for this campus is considered as a start of a reform. The choice of themes is directed by traditional construction culture and its continuation: Garden making, construction, differentiation, material recycling and reuse. The Chinese character of “ ªÿ” [enclose] is the theme of the series, which forms the layout of “ ”™“ [create, compose, shape, form, construct]. In fact, the simple “court” of traditional China can be made to accommodate nearly all functions. What is attempted here is a “court”-based free typology, related to both, the tradition and more importantly, the gigantic space and functional requirement of this building. In the character of “ ªÿ” building and nature occupy half of the space. As the sloping, twisting, and turning occurs on the site, the building twists and transforms accordingly, thus addresses uniformity and variation at the same time. The inevitable bulk of the buildings are purposefully lowered, horizontal sunscreen slope emphasizes the horizontal extension of the corresponding mountain range. The base of the handicraft-school is made with stone by a local method, traditionally used in the local tea field construction. This is a symbolic gesture representing the rooting of the school in the surrounding. An important aspect of the design is the “free” concept. This “free” concept is not just about its architectural forms, but its sensitive response to the nature. The structures are usually similar or identical to each other, but its variations are created by the relationship with the site. The basic architectural types are sensible to fast and large scale constructions. At the same time, changes in design are frequent and spontaneous during construction process. This provides a platform from where architects and artists will participate in the process to “build”. A large collection of over two millions pieces of tiles of different ages and sizes, salvaged from the traditional houses demolished all over the province of Zhejiang, will cover the roofs of the campus architecture. In sharp contrast to the fast and mass construction concept of today, the concept seeks to embody another philosophy.

Project location: Zhuantang Town, Hangzhou City, China
Site Area: 200 mu [one mu = 666,66 sqm]
Project size: 67.000 sqm
composed of ten buildings, including a library, a gallery, a small stadium, a workshop tower, six academic and workshop buildings, two traditional style bridges cross the river, two hillside art studio.
Architect: WANG Shu, LU Wenyu
Firm: Ye-Yu Architectural Design Studio/CAA
Firm in Cooperation: CCA/Landscape Design Company
Design Period: 3/2002 – 3/2003
Construction Period: 5/2003 – 12/2004
Structure type: Reinforced concrete frame + steel frame 

Via:http://www.chinese-architects.com/en/amateur/projects_en.html

@2 years ago with 4 notes
#traditional construction #Wang Shu #Chinese Architecture 
Small Project
The creative campus at Snape Maltings was founded by Benjamin Britten in derelict industrial buildings on the Suffolk coast. The Dovecote is part of Haworth Tompkin’s phased extension of the campus for Aldeburgh Music and inhabits the ruins of a dovecote overlooking the marshes. The new form expresses the internal volume of the Victorian structure as a Cor-ten steel ‘lining’, a welded monocoque that was prefabricated and craned into position.
A large north light roof window provides even light for artists, while a small mezzanine platform with a writing desk incorporates a fully opening glazed corner window that gives long views over the marshes towards the sea. The single volume will be used by artists in residence, by musicians as rehearsal or performance space, by staff for meetings or as a temporary exhibition space. 
 Only the minimum necessary brickwork repairs were carried out to stabilise the existing ruin prior to the new structure being inserted. Decaying existing windows were left alone and vegetation growing over the dovecote was protected to allow it to continue a natural process of ageing and decay. The interior walls and ceiling of the space are lined with spruce plywood to create a timber ‘box’ within the Cor-ten shell.
Via: http://www.haworthtompkins.com/built/proj04/index.html

Small Project

The creative campus at Snape Maltings was founded by Benjamin Britten in derelict industrial buildings on the Suffolk coast. The Dovecote is part of Haworth Tompkin’s phased extension of the campus for Aldeburgh Music and inhabits the ruins of a dovecote overlooking the marshes. The new form expresses the internal volume of the Victorian structure as a Cor-ten steel ‘lining’, a welded monocoque that was prefabricated and craned into position.

A large north light roof window provides even light for artists, while a small mezzanine platform with a writing desk incorporates a fully opening glazed corner window that gives long views over the marshes towards the sea. The single volume will be used by artists in residence, by musicians as rehearsal or performance space, by staff for meetings or as a temporary exhibition space. 

 Only the minimum necessary brickwork repairs were carried out to stabilise the existing ruin prior to the new structure being inserted. Decaying existing windows were left alone and vegetation growing over the dovecote was protected to allow it to continue a natural process of ageing and decay. The interior walls and ceiling of the space are lined with spruce plywood to create a timber ‘box’ within the Cor-ten shell.

Via: http://www.haworthtompkins.com/built/proj04/index.html

@2 years ago with 2 notes
#architecture #haworthtompkins #dovecote #Aldeburgh Music 
The Battle for Jeju Island: How the Arms Race is Threatening a Korean Paradise
Imagine dropping fifty-seven cement caissons, each one the size of a four-story house, on miles of beach and soft coral reefs. It would destroy the marine ecosystem. Our imperfect knowledge already tells us that at least nine endangered species would be wiped out, and no one knows or perhaps can know the chain reaction.
That’s what is about to happen on the pristine coastline of Jeju Island, a culturally and ecologically unique land off the southern coast of the Korean peninsula. It seems motivated by the United States’ urge to encircle China with its Aegis anti-ballistic system — something China has called a dangerous provocation — and by the South Korean navy’s construction of a massive naval base for aircraft carriers, submarines and destroyers to carry Aegis…
Read More: http://www.onearth.org/blog/robert-redford-jeju-island-korean-paradise-threatened

The Battle for Jeju Island: How the Arms Race is Threatening a Korean Paradise

Imagine dropping fifty-seven cement caissons, each one the size of a four-story house, on miles of beach and soft coral reefs. It would destroy the marine ecosystem. Our imperfect knowledge already tells us that at least nine endangered species would be wiped out, and no one knows or perhaps can know the chain reaction.

That’s what is about to happen on the pristine coastline of Jeju Island, a culturally and ecologically unique land off the southern coast of the Korean peninsula. It seems motivated by the United States’ urge to encircle China with its Aegis anti-ballistic system — something China has called a dangerous provocation — and by the South Korean navy’s construction of a massive naval base for aircraft carriers, submarines and destroyers to carry Aegis…

Read More: http://www.onearth.org/blog/robert-redford-jeju-island-korean-paradise-threatened

@2 years ago with 2 notes
#Jeju Island #South Korean navy #marine ecosystem 
"Chasing Ice"


Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers.

Via: http://chasingice.com/
http://www.sundance.org/video/meet-the-artists-12-jeff-orlowski/

"Chasing Ice"

Chasing Ice is the story of one man’s mission to change the tide of history by gathering undeniable evidence of our changing planet. Within months of that first trip to Iceland, the photographer conceived the boldest expedition of his life: The Extreme Ice Survey. With a band of young adventurers in tow, Balog began deploying revolutionary time-lapse cameras across the brutal Arctic to capture a multi-year record of the world’s changing glaciers.

Via: http://chasingice.com/

http://www.sundance.org/video/meet-the-artists-12-jeff-orlowski/

@2 years ago with 1 note
#Arctic #changing glaciers #Ice Survey #sundance 
Golden Self-Inflating Home That Fits in Your Pocket!

Martin Azua‘s Basic House is a brilliant self-inflating shelter that you can fold up and take with you – wherever the wind blows! With economic downturns, population growth, and dwindling space creating a widespread reversal of basic values, the lightweight tent-like structure provides a cozy low-impact shelter that can be set up in a snap.

Via: http://www.martinazua.com/eng/all/basic-house/

Golden Self-Inflating Home That Fits in Your Pocket!

Martin Azua‘s Basic House is a brilliant self-inflating shelter that you can fold up and take with you – wherever the wind blows! With economic downturns, population growth, and dwindling space creating a widespread reversal of basic values, the lightweight tent-like structure provides a cozy low-impact shelter that can be set up in a snap.

Via: http://www.martinazua.com/eng/all/basic-house/

@2 years ago
#inflating shelter 
Amazing Eco-Capsule is a Hanging Tree-Nest

Imagine walking through the woods of Dorset,UK on a blistery, snowy day and coming across Jesse Randzio’s amazing eco-capsule - it’s green, made from local materials, sits in a nest of netting that doubles as a ladder, and there’s even an up-cycled stove (and chimney) inside that can boil water for a cup of tea! Jesse used an AV Custerson Award to conduct a month-long workshop in Hooke Park with 12 students from the Architectural Association. The ultimate low-impact woodland retreat, “A Separate Place”, is the result of that collaboration.

Read More: http://www.dezeen.com/2011/11/29/a-separate-place-by-jesse-randzio-and-architectural-association-students/#more-176842

Amazing Eco-Capsule is a Hanging Tree-Nest

Imagine walking through the woods of Dorset,UK on a blistery, snowy day and coming across Jesse Randzio’s amazing eco-capsule - it’s green, made from local materials, sits in a nest of netting that doubles as a ladder, and there’s even an up-cycled stove (and chimney) inside that can boil water for a cup of tea! Jesse used an AV Custerson Award to conduct a month-long workshop in Hooke Park with 12 students from the Architectural Association. The ultimate low-impact woodland retreat, “A Separate Place”, is the result of that collaboration.

Read More: http://www.dezeen.com/2011/11/29/a-separate-place-by-jesse-randzio-and-architectural-association-students/#more-176842

@2 years ago
Ai Weiwei’s Magnificent ‘Forever’ Installation Builds a Glimmering Cavern from 1,200 Bikes
Cycling is one of the most common forms of transportation in China, but Ai Weiwei manipulates the bicycles by removing their primary function and making them static. The freedom associated with cycling is lost and the bicycles are piled together in a labyrinth-like way that renders them useless and immobile. Visitors can stand below the installation and see each detail from a new angle, gaining a new perspective on the bicycles and reflecting on their meaning.

Ai Weiwei: http://www.aiweiwei.com/
Taipei Fine Arts Museum: http://www.tfam.museum/

Ai Weiwei’s Magnificent ‘Forever’ Installation Builds a Glimmering Cavern from 1,200 Bikes

Cycling is one of the most common forms of transportation in China, but Ai Weiwei manipulates the bicycles by removing their primary function and making them static. The freedom associated with cycling is lost and the bicycles are piled together in a labyrinth-like way that renders them useless and immobile. Visitors can stand below the installation and see each detail from a new angle, gaining a new perspective on the bicycles and reflecting on their meaning.

Ai Weiwei: http://www.aiweiwei.com/

Taipei Fine Arts Museum: http://www.tfam.museum/

@2 years ago

The High Line
The High Line is a public park built on an historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. It is owned by the City of New York, and maintained and operated by Friends of the High Line. Founded in 1999 by community residents, Friends of the High Line fought for the High Line’s preservation and transformation at a time when the historic structure was under the threat of demolition. It is now the non-profit conservancy working with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation to make sure the High Line is maintained as an extraordinary public space for all visitors to enjoy. In addition to overseeing maintenance, operations, and public programming for the park, Friends of the High Line works to raise the essential private funds to support more than 90 percent of the park’s annual operating budget, and to advocate for the preservation and transformation of the High Line at the Rail Yards, the third and final section of the historic structure, which runs between West 30th and West 34th Streets.
Via:http://www.thehighline.org/
Photo: Joel Sternfeld

The High Line

The High Line is a public park built on an historic freight rail line elevated above the streets on Manhattan’s West Side. It is owned by the City of New York, and maintained and operated by Friends of the High Line. Founded in 1999 by community residents, Friends of the High Line fought for the High Line’s preservation and transformation at a time when the historic structure was under the threat of demolition. It is now the non-profit conservancy working with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation to make sure the High Line is maintained as an extraordinary public space for all visitors to enjoy. In addition to overseeing maintenance, operations, and public programming for the park, Friends of the High Line works to raise the essential private funds to support more than 90 percent of the park’s annual operating budget, and to advocate for the preservation and transformation of the High Line at the Rail Yards, the third and final section of the historic structure, which runs between West 30th and West 34th Streets.

Via:http://www.thehighline.org/

Photo: Joel Sternfeld

@2 years ago with 2 notes
#The High Line #public park built #Friends of the High Line #historic structure #public space #historic structure 
WIth London Monuments, Artist Shows Just How High Sea Levels Will be in 3111

London has a great history of public sculpture. Many of these monuments are often overlooked by this city’s residents as they go about their daily business. At a moment when discussions about climate change are omnipresent, the visual images associated with this issue tend to show vulnerable landscapes from around the world, but the situation for cultural landmarks at the heart of our metropolis is equally precarious. Plunge encircles noteworthy monuments in London with an illuminated blue line, showing the predicated sea level in 3111. At one level the viewer can extend an imaginary line from the monument across London placing themselves deep below the water’s surface, at another level the illumination suggests a protective shell proposing that we still have chance to change this situation.

Via:http://www.michaelpinsky.com/

WIth London Monuments, Artist Shows Just How High Sea Levels Will be in 3111

London has a great history of public sculpture. Many of these monuments are often overlooked by this city’s residents as they go about their daily business. At a moment when discussions about climate change are omnipresent, the visual images associated with this issue tend to show vulnerable landscapes from around the world, but the situation for cultural landmarks at the heart of our metropolis is equally precarious. Plunge encircles noteworthy monuments in London with an illuminated blue line, showing the predicated sea level in 3111. At one level the viewer can extend an imaginary line from the monument across London placing themselves deep below the water’s surface, at another level the illumination suggests a protective shell proposing that we still have chance to change this situation.

Via:http://www.michaelpinsky.com/

@2 years ago with 1 note
#Sea Levels #London #climate change #Michael Pinsky 
The Crabs that Build Their Own Galaxy

Small hermit and soldier crabs in Malaysia and Australia build their home digging a deep hope in the sand on a beach. They got a good idea of how to move sand up during his construction. Down in the hole this crab is making sand balls and later push them up to the surface, 2-3 balls at a time. Pushing sand ball more far from the hole they form a kind of sand ball flower or sand ball galaxy.


Via: http://www.arkinspace.com/2012/01/crabs-that-build-their-own-galaxy.html

The Crabs that Build Their Own Galaxy

Small hermit and soldier crabs in Malaysia and Australia build their home digging a deep hope in the sand on a beach. They got a good idea of how to move sand up during his construction. Down in the hole this crab is making sand balls and later push them up to the surface, 2-3 balls at a time. Pushing sand ball more far from the hole they form a kind of sand ball flower or sand ball galaxy.

Via: http://www.arkinspace.com/2012/01/crabs-that-build-their-own-galaxy.html

@2 years ago with 5 notes
#crab #sand balls 
Cultivating the Future of the Greenhouse

H.O.R.T.U.S. is designed to be a thoroughly interactive environment. Visitors meander through a field of green carpet, gently exhaling into plastic tubes that dangle like the exposed roots of an orchid. Like in any good interactive exhibit, visitors are also invited to whip out their smart phones and scan QR codes to access information about the algae, triggering a flow of information in tandem with the flow of biomass. Scans and tweets about the exhibition are harnessed to actively shape a virtual garden rendered in real time on a screen in the exhibition.
Read More: 
http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog/dyn/37707/hortus/

Cultivating the Future of the Greenhouse

H.O.R.T.U.S. is designed to be a thoroughly interactive environment. Visitors meander through a field of green carpet, gently exhaling into plastic tubes that dangle like the exposed roots of an orchid. Like in any good interactive exhibit, visitors are also invited to whip out their smart phones and scan QR codes to access information about the algae, triggering a flow of information in tandem with the flow of biomass. Scans and tweets about the exhibition are harnessed to actively shape a virtual garden rendered in real time on a screen in the exhibition.

Read More: 

http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog/dyn/37707/hortus/

@2 years ago with 2 notes
#interactive environment #biomass #virtual garden 
Ryue Nishizawa’s vertical garden house in Tokyo

When this architectural model surfaced back in 2006, as beautiful as it was, it was hard to visualize what kind of home would actually take root in Tokyo. And after several years of silence it appeared the model was just another overly-ambitious architectural venture that got shelved away. Well, finally images of iconic architect Ryue Nishizawa’s House & Garden have appeared…
Read More: http://www.domusweb.it/en/architecture/tokyo-s-vertical-thresholds-2-ryue-nishizawa

Ryue Nishizawa’s vertical garden house in Tokyo

When this architectural model surfaced back in 2006, as beautiful as it was, it was hard to visualize what kind of home would actually take root in Tokyo. And after several years of silence it appeared the model was just another overly-ambitious architectural venture that got shelved away. Well, finally images of iconic architect Ryue Nishizawa’s House & Garden have appeared…

Read More: http://www.domusweb.it/en/architecture/tokyo-s-vertical-thresholds-2-ryue-nishizawa

@2 years ago
Two Japanese Mountain Villages are Beautiful Examples of Historic Sustainable Architecture

Preserved as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the quiet Japanese villages of Shirakawa-gō and Gokayama are a beautiful example of the gasshō-zukuri, or “prayer-hands construction,” historic building design. Originally developed to support silk production in the 17th Century, the villages are the only example of Gassho-zukuri construction in all of Japan. The strong, sustainable homes were built with a direct relationship to the land, each having a steeply slanted thatched roof to help the snow slide off. UNESCO describes the villages as “outstanding examples of a traditional way of life perfectly adapted to the environment and people’s social and economic circumstances.”



UNESCO World Heritage Site: http://whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=31&id_site=734

Two Japanese Mountain Villages are Beautiful Examples of Historic Sustainable Architecture

Preserved as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, the quiet Japanese villages of Shirakawa-gō and Gokayama are a beautiful example of the gasshō-zukuri, or “prayer-hands construction,” historic building design. Originally developed to support silk production in the 17th Century, the villages are the only example of Gassho-zukuri construction in all of Japan. The strong, sustainable homes were built with a direct relationship to the land, each having a steeply slanted thatched roof to help the snow slide off. UNESCO describes the villages as “outstanding examples of a traditional way of life perfectly adapted to the environment and people’s social and economic circumstances.”

UNESCO World Heritage Site: http://whc.unesco.org/pg.cfm?cid=31&id_site=734

@2 years ago
A Tower of Nests
The Tower of Nests, brainchild of Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture, was recently awarded first prize at the 2011 World Architecture Festival in Barcelona in the Future Projects Category. At 50-stories, the tower will feature a facade of natural materials such as mud, straw, stone, and wicker as a way of inviting urban species to make their habitat in an otherwise stark city-scape. Inside, both commercial and residential space will offer Shanghai a chance to live and work alongside animals in their somewhat natural-seeming habitats.
Read More: http://www.kjellgrenkaminsky.se/projects/127-a-tower-of-nests.html

A Tower of Nests

The Tower of Nests, brainchild of Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture, was recently awarded first prize at the 2011 World Architecture Festival in Barcelona in the Future Projects Category. At 50-stories, the tower will feature a facade of natural materials such as mud, straw, stone, and wicker as a way of inviting urban species to make their habitat in an otherwise stark city-scape. Inside, both commercial and residential space will offer Shanghai a chance to live and work alongside animals in their somewhat natural-seeming habitats.

Read More: http://www.kjellgrenkaminsky.se/projects/127-a-tower-of-nests.html

@2 years ago